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2 Year Modification

Indiana PYs 2018-2019 Published

Located in:
  • II. Strategic Elements

    The Unified or Combined State Plan must include a Strategic Planning Elements section that analyzes the State’s current economic environment and identifies the State’s overall vision for its workforce development system. The required elements in this section allow the State to develop data-driven goals for preparing an educated and skilled workforce and to identify successful strategies for aligning workforce development programs. Unless otherwise noted, all Strategic Planning Elements apply to Combined State Plan partner programs included in the plan as well as to core programs.

II. a. 1. A. Economic Analysis (A.I -A.III)

The Unified or Combined State Plan must include an analysis of the economic conditions and trends in the State, including sub-State regions and any specific economic areas identified by the State. This must include-

  • i. Existing Demand Industry Sectors and Occupations

    Provide an analysis of the industries and occupations for which there is existing demand.

  • ii. Emerging Industry Sectors and Occupation

    Provide an analysis of the industries and occupations for which demand is emerging.

  • iii. Employers’ Employment Needs

    With regard to the industry sectors and occupations identified in 1 and 2 above, provide an assessment of the employment needs of employers, including a description of the knowledge, skills, and abilities required, including credentials and licenses.

Current Narrative:

With regard to the industry sectors and occupations identified in 1 and 2 above, provide an assessment of the employment needs of employers, including a description of the knowledge, skills, and abilities required, including credentials and licenses.

Indiana has the challenge of filling one million job in less than 10 years. Data shows that Hoosier employers will have to replace an estimated 700,000 workers over the next decade, and an additional 300,000 new jobs are projected for the same time frame. As we dig a bit deeper into those 1 million jobs, below is what we find.

As to existing demand, Indiana’s Economic Analysis Report published in October 2017, reviewed online job posting to determine demand, which varies by industry. Demand for the manufacturing, health care and social services, administration, support, waste management, and remediation services, and professional, scientific, and technical services industries showed the most growth in online posting demand since August, 2016. The accommodation and food services industry saw the most over the year declines.

As to emerging demand, INDIANA CAREER READY is a new Indiana Department of Workforce Development website that, in part, provides information on high-demand, high-wage jobs for today and tomorrow (www.indianacareerready.com). The INDemand focus will help ensure a long and rewarding career. The demand indicator used is based on a methodology that ranks all Indiana jobs based on demand and wages (specifically total Openings (X2), Growth Openings, Percentage Change, Real Time Labor Market Information, and Wages for both Short Term and Long Term outlook and Bureau of Labor Statistics wage estimates). An occupation will be assigned between 1 and 5 flames, depending on how “in demand” that occupation is in Indiana. Some of the 5-flame INDemand Occupations on Indiana Career Ready are:

  • Software Developers, Applications

  • Management Analysts

  • General and Operations Managers

  • Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists

  • Nurse Practitioners

  • Physical Therapists

  • Accountants and Auditors

  • Personal Financial Advisors

  • Computer Systems Analysts

  • Mechanical Engineers.

  • Medical and Health Services Managers

  • Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters

  • Industrial Machinery Mechanics

  • Electricians

  • Computer and Information Systems Managers

  • Industrial Engineers

  • Physicians and Surgeons, All Other

  • Registered Nurses

  • Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Except Technical and Scientific ProductsConstruction Laborers

Based on analysis of occupational projections data (including supply, demand and wages), Indiana has identified these priority sectors. Those are: advanced manufacturing and logistics, health science, agriculture and information technology.

As to the employment needs of employers in the above identified sectors and occupations, Indiana has assessed the skills-based work activities needed at the occupation level using Skills Engine, a skills analytics database, and have vetted those with Indiana employers through focus groups and surveys. While this work is ongoing, initial findings are that employers most desire employability skills (soft skills). According to Burning Glass Labor Insight/Jobs in 2017, the top listed employability skill, by far, is communication skills, followed by writing, organizational skills, and physical demand. Specialized or technical skills listed in highest demand include customer service, sales, Microsoft Excel, scheduling, and Microsoft Office. The top certifications in demand from advertising employers, include Registered Nurse (RN), Commercial Driver’s License (CDL), First Aid (CPR AED), Basic Cardiac Life Support Certification, Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA), and Certified Public Accountant (CPA).

A thorough analysis of Indiana’s economy and workforce can be found at: http://www.hoosierdata.in.gov/docs/annual_econ_analysis/INDIANA%20ECONOMIC%20ANALYSIS%20REPORT%20PY2016.pdf.

Additionally, for a Vocational Rehabilitation specific analysis, see Vocational Rehabilitation Section j at pages 117-203 below.