Florida PYs 2020-2023 Published Approved

Located in:
  • II. Strategic Elements

    The Unified or Combined State Plan must include a Strategic Planning Elements section that analyzes the State’s current economic environment and identifies the State’s overall vision for its workforce development system.  The required elements in this section allow the State to develop data-driven goals for preparing an educated and skilled workforce and to identify successful strategies for aligning workforce development programs to support economic growth.  Unless otherwise noted, all Strategic Planning Elements apply to Combined State Plan partner programs included in the plan as well as to core programs. 

II. a. 1. A. Economic Analysis

The Unified or Combined State Plan must include an analysis of the economic conditions and trends in the State, including sub-State regions and any specific economic areas identified by the State.  This must include—

  • i. Existing Demand Industry Sectors and Occupations

    Provide an analysis of the industries and occupations for which there is existing demand.

  • ii. Emerging Demand Industry Sectors and Occupations

    Provide an analysis of the industries and occupations for which demand is emerging.

  • iii. Employers’ Employment Needs

    With regard to the industry sectors and occupations identified in (A)(i) and (ii), provide an assessment of the employment needs of employers, including a description of the knowledge, skills, and abilities required, including credentials and licenses.

Current Narrative:

II. STRATEGIC ELEMENTS                                                     

(a) 
Economic, Workforce and Workforce Development Activities Analysis

(1)  Economic and Workforce Analysis

(A)  Economic Analysis

This section discusses Florida’s industry and organizational profile and other economic indicators. Industry is the type of activity at a person’s place of work, while occupation is the kind of work a person does to earn a living. Occupations cut across industries. For example, maids and housekeeping cleaners are found in accommodation and food service industries, healthcare and social assistance, and administrative and support services.

(i)  Existing Demand Industry Sectors and Occupations

Existing Demand Industry Sectors
An industry super sector is an aggregated grouping of employers that produce and provide similar goods and services- a collection of similar industries. An industry group is a group of employers that produces similar goods or provides similar types of services.

Nonagricultural Employment by Industry
As of September 2019, super sector industries with the most demand were all services-producing industries, with Trade, Transportation and Utilities generating the most demand (1,810,800 jobs), followed by Professional and Business Services (1,422,500 jobs), Education and Health Services (1,372,900 jobs) and Leisure and Hospitality (1,265,400 jobs). Financial Activities (+3.3 percent) and Construction (+2.9 percent) were the fastest-growing major industries over the year.

As of October 2019, the national annual growth rates (seasonally adjusted) in Construction (+2.0 percent), Manufacturing (+0.4 percent), Trade, Transportation and Utilities (+0.5 percent), Information (-0.4 percent), Financial Activities (+1.3 percent), Professional and Business Services (+1.9 percent), Other Services (+1.3 percent) and Government (+0.7 percent) were less than the expansion rates for Florida.

In September 2019, Florida (+2.5 percent) had the strongest over-the-year growth rate in total nonagricultural employment among the 10 most populous states, ahead of Texas (+2.4 percent). Among all states, Florida ranked fourth in over-the-year growth rate behind Nevada (+3.2 percent), Idaho (+3.1%) and Washington (+2.7% percent).

Figure 2.01
Nonagricultural Employment in Florida, Seasonally Adjusted

  Industry TitleSeptember 2019August 2019September 2018Over the Month Change LevelOver the Month Change %Over the Year Change LevelOver the Year Change %
Total Nonagricultural Employment9,052,7009,041,6008,828,00011,100 0.1224,700 2.5
Total Private7,925,6007,916,9007,710,6008,700 0.1215,000 2.8
Goods Producing954,900955,800926,300-900-0.128,600 3.1
Service Producing8,097,8008,085,8007,901,70012,000 0.1196,100 2.5
Private Service Providing6,970,7006,961,1006,784,3009,600 0.1186,400 2.7
Mining, Logging, and Construction573,600572,300552,7001,300 0.220,900 3.8
Construction567,700566,200551,5001,500 0.316,200 2.9
Manufacturing381,300383,500373,600-2,200-0.67,700 2.1
Durable Goods258,900260,000255,200-1,100-0.43,700 1.4
Nondurable Goods122,400123,500118,400-1,100-0.94,000 3.4
Trade, Transportation, and Utilities1,810,8001,808,4001,790,4002,400 0.120,400 1.1
Wholesale Trade354,100353,600347,800500 0.16,300 1.8
Retail Trade1,141,3001,139,8001,135,4001,500 0.15,900 0.5
Transportation, Warehousing,    Utilities315,400315,000307,200400 0.18,200 2.7
Information137,000135,900139,1001,100 0.8-2,100-1.5
Financial Activities596,800595,600577,7001,200 0.219,100 3.3
Finance and Insurance393,600393,900387,900-300-0.15,700 1.5
Real Estate, Rental, and Leasing203,200201,700189,8001,500 0.713,400 7.1
Professional and Business Services1,422,5001,421,9001,373,300600*49,200 3.6
Professional and Technical   

Services
605,500604,700575,400800 0.130,100 5.2
Management of Companies and

Enterprises
110,300110,200108,800100 0.11,500 1.4
Administrative and Waste Services706,700707,000689,100-300*17,600 2.6
Education and Health Services1,372,9001,372,3001,313,300600*59,600 4.5
Educational Services179,300179,200169,400100 0.19,900 5.8
Health Care and Social Assistance1,193,6001,193,1001,143,900500*49,700 4.3
Leisure and Hospitality1,265,4001,264,1001,235,1001,300 0.130,300 2.5
Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation244,300244,500235,200-200-0.19,100 3.9
Accommodation and Food Services1,021,1001,019,600999,9001,500 0.121,200 2.1
Other Services365,300362,900355,4002,400 0.79,900 2.8
Total Government1,127,1001,124,7001,117,4002,400 0.29,700 0.9
Federal Government144,300144,300139,6000 0.04,700 3.4
State Government258,200257,500259,100700 0.3-900-0.3
Local Government724,600722,900718,7001,700 0.25,900 0.8

Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, Current Employment Statistics, October 2019.

Industry Detail
The Industry Detail section shows employment in the industry super sectors over time. The analyses show impacts of recessions over each industry and current trends. Recessions are indicated by gray bars in the graphs below. The calculations in this section are all seasonally adjusted.

Construction
Florida experienced large declines in Construction employment from 2006 to 2011 due to the bursting of the housing bubble. Construction employment peaked in April 2006 at 691,700 jobs and is currently at 567,700 jobs (a decrease of 124,200 jobs). At the low point during this decline, Construction employment was 334,000 (June 2011). Since June 2011, 233,700 jobs in the industry have been recovered.

As noted, Construction employment in September 2019 was 567,700. The over-the-year change in September 2019 (+16,200 jobs, +2.9 percent from 2018) was 45,300 less when compared to the over-the-year change in September 2018 (+61,500 jobs, +12.6 percent from 2017). The number of jobs in this sector has been trending upward over the past seven years.

Figure 2.02
Florida Construction Employment, Seasonally Adjusted

Figure 2.02 Florida Construction Employment, Seasonally Adjusted;  This graph illustrates Florida Construction Employment, Seasonally Adjusted. It is a graph that shows a range of employed people from (300,000 to 750,000) from the date of Jan 1990 to May 2019. It also shows the Early 90s Recession, the Dot Com Bubble, The Great Recession of the late 2010s and finally the Great Recovery.
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics Program, September 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manufacturing
Manufacturing in Florida is heavily dependent on construction and several subsectors of the industry lost jobs due to the decline in housing activity. From 2003 to 2006, Manufacturing employment began to ramp up until the housing bubble burst. During the recession, there was a rapid decrease in Manufacturing employment until 2010. Since the low in March 2010 (308,000 employed), 73,000 jobs in the industry have been recovered.

In September 2019, the employment was 381,300. The over-the-year change in September 2019 (+7,700 jobs, +2.1 percent) was 7,900 lower when compared to September 2018 (+15,600, +4.4 percent). The number of jobs in this sector has been trending upward over the past seven years.

Figure 2.03
Florida Manufacturing Employment, Seasonally Adjusted

Figure 2.03 Florida Manufacturing Employment, Seasonally Adjusted; This line graph illustrates Florida Manufacturing Employment, Seasonally Adjusted. It is a graph that shows a range of employed people from (290,000 to 540,000) from the date of Jan 1990 to May 2019.  The graph shows a rapid decrease in Manufacturing employment from 2007 until mid-2009. From March 2010 to now shows a gradual recovery in Manufacturing jobs.
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics Program, September 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trade, Transportation and Utilities
This industry is heavily dependent on tourism and the general economic vitality of the state’s economy. The industry is currently above its previous peak in employment.

In September 2019, employment was 1,810,800. The over-the-year change in September 2019 (+20,400 jobs, +1.1 percent) was 56,500 less when compared to September 2018 (+76,900, +4.5 percent). The number of jobs in this sector has been trending upward over the past seven years.

Figure 2.04
Florida Trade, Transportation and Utilities Employment, Seasonally Adjusted

Figure 2.04 Florida Trade, Transportation and Utilities Employment, Seasonally Adjusted;  This line graph illustrates Florida Trade, Transportation and Utilities Employment, Seasonally Adjusted. It is a graph that shows a range of employed people from (1,180,000 to 1,880,000) from the date of Jan 1990 to May 2019. This Graph shows jobs trending upward for the past seven years.
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics Program, September 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Information
Florida experienced large declines in information employment from 2001 to 2004 due to the bursting of the tech bubble and from 2007 to 2010 due to the bursting of the housing bubble. Industry employment has remained steady since the trough of the Great Recession and is currently 4,100 jobs greater than the August 2012 low of 132,900.

In September 2019, employment was 137,000. The over-the-year change in September 2019 (-2,100 jobs, -1.5 percent) was 4,600 lower when compared to September 2018 (+2,500, 1.8 percent). The number of jobs in this sector has remained constant over the past five years.

Figure 2.05
Florida Information Employment, Seasonally Adjusted

Figure 2.05 Florida Information Employment, Seasonally Adjusted; This graph shows Florida Information Employment, Seasonally Adjusted. It is a graph that shows a range of employed people from (120,000 to 200,000) from the date of Jan 1990 to May 2019. 2001 shows peek employment of around 190,000 people employed in Information, but the Dot Com Bubble affected this industry drastically. Although the Florida Information employment haven’t reached the Pre Dot-Com Bubble level it has been constant the past five years with over 130,000 employed in the field.
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics Program, September 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Financial Activities
Financial activities employment in Florida previously peaked at 558,000 jobs in May 2006 and experienced a rapid decline until reaching 476,000 employed in April 2010. Since the low, 129,300 jobs in the industry have been recovered and it is currently above its previous peak in employment.

In September 2019, employment was 596,800. The over-the-year change in September 2019 (+19,100 jobs, +3.3 percent) was 4,700 more when compared to September 2018 (+14,400, +2.6 percent). The number of jobs in this sector has been trending upward over the past seven years.

Figure 2.06
Florida Financial Activities Employment, Seasonally Adjusted

Figure 2.06 Florida Financial Activities Employment, Seasonally Adjusted; This is a line graph illustration of Florida Financial Activities Employment, Seasonally Adjusted. It is a graph that shows a range of employed people from (350,000 to 600,000) from the date of Jan 1990 to May 2019. This Graph shows a steady increase in Financial Activities Employment from the early 90s to the Great Recession for 2008.  The Number of Jobs in this sector has been trending upward over the past seven years.
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics Program, September 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professional and Business Services
Employment in Florida’s professional and business services industry experienced a rapid decline during the Great Recession, bottoming out at 987,400 jobs in August 2009. Currently, industry employment is above its previous peak.

In September 2019, the employment was 1,422,500. The over-the-year change in September 2019 (+49,200 jobs, +3.6 percent) was 18,900 less when compared to September 2018 (+68,100, +5.2 percent). The number of jobs in this sector has been trending upward over the past seven years.

Figure 2.07
Florida Professional and Business Services Employment, Seasonally Adjusted

Figure 2.07 Florida Professional and Business Services Employment, Seasonally Adjusted; This graph illustrates Florida Professional and Business Services Employment, Seasonally Adjusted. It is a graph that shows a range of employed people from (350,000 to 1,550,000) from the date of Jan 1990 to May 2019. This graph shows the steady growth in this sector from the 90s to mid-2008, which is around the time of the Great Recession. The number of jobs in this sector has been trending upward over the past seven years.
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics Program, September 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Education and Health Services
Florida did not experience a decline in Education and Health Services employment during the recent recession. However, the rate of job growth did slow down during the recession.

In September 2019, employment was 1,372,900. The over-the-year change in September 2019 (+59,600 jobs, +4.5 percent) was 12,500 more when compared to September 2018 (+47,100, +3.7 percent). The number of jobs in this sector has been trending upward for over two decades.

Figure 2.08
Florida Education and Health Services Employment (Seasonally Adjusted)

Figure 2.08 Florida Education and Health Services Employment (Seasonally Adjusted); This graph illustrates Florida Education and Health Services Employment, Seasonally Adjusted. It is a graph that shows a range of employed people from (550,000 to 1,450,000) from the date of Jan 1990 to March 2019. Figure 8 shows a steady increase in jobs in this sector for the past two decades.
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics Program, September 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leisure and Hospitality
Leisure and hospitality employment in Florida experienced a large decrease during the Great Recession, reaching 915,100 employed in December 2009. Currently, industry employment is above its previous peak.

In September 2019, the employment was 1,265,400. The over-the-year change in September 2019 (+30,300 jobs, +2.5 percent) was 40,300 less when compared to September 2018 (+70,600, +6.1 percent). The number of jobs in this sector has been trending upward over the past seven years.

Figure 2.09
Florida Leisure and Hospitality Employment (Seasonally Adjusted)

Figure 2.09 Florida Leisure and Hospitality Employment (Seasonally Adjusted); This graph illustrates Florida Leisure and Hospitality Employment, Seasonally Adjusted. It is a graph that shows a range of employed people from (600,000 to 1,300,000) from the date of Jan 1990 to May 2019. Figure 9 shows a gradual increase in jobs for the past seven years for this sector.
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics Program, September 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Services
The Other Services sector comprises establishments engaged in providing services not specifically provided for elsewhere in the industry classification system. Examples range from automotive repair and maintenance to environment, conservation and wildlife organizations. Other services employment in Florida experienced large declines from 2007 to around 2009. Industry employment is currently above its previous peak.

In September 2019, employment was 365,300. The over-the-year change in September 2019 (+9,900 jobs, +2.8 percent) was 4,800 less when compared to September 2018 (+14,700, +4.3 percent). The number of jobs in this sector has been trending upward over the past seven years.

Figure 2.10
Florida Other Services Employment Seasonally Adjusted

Figure 2.10 Florida Other Services Employment Seasonally Adjusted; This graph illustrates Florida “Other” Services Employment Seasonally Adjusted is illustrated in Figure 10. It is a graph that shows a range of employed people from (200,000 to 380,000) from the date of Jan 1990 to May 2019. This graph shows jobs trending upward from January 1991 until January 2008. Florida Other Services took a hit during the Great Recession but have been recovering for the past seven years.
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics Program, September 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Government
Florida experienced declines in government employment from 2008 to 2012. In September 2019, employment was 1,127,100. The over-the-year change in September 2019 (+9,700 jobs, +0.9 percent) was 4,600 less when compared to September 2018 (+14,300, +1.3 percent). The number of jobs in this sector has increased over the past three years.

Figure 2.11
Florida Government Employment (Seasonally Adjusted)

Figure 2.11 Florida Government Employment (Seasonally Adjusted); This graph illustrates Florida Government Employment Seasonally Adjusted is illustrated in Figure 11. It is a graph that shows a range of employed people from (800,000 to 1,200,000) from the date of Jan 1990 to May 2019. This graph shows Government Employment growth until 2008. From 2008 to 2012 Florida experienced declines in government employment. Florida Government Employment is trending upwards and has been for the past three years.
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics Program, September 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Florida’s recovery from the Great Recession is strong. Most of the major industry sectors have returned to growth patterns in evidence before the recession and many of these have higher rates of growth compared to the previous major expansion. While construction has not returned to the previous peak number of jobs, current growth rates (September 2019, + 2.9 percent from 2018) are healthy. There are no indicators of overbuilding or bubbles in the current housing market. Higher-paying industry sectors are experiencing healthy and sustainable expansion: manufacturing (+2.1 percent); professional and business services (+3.6 percent); and financial activities (+3.3 percent).

Emerging Demand Industries
The emerging industry groups were chosen from among the four-digit North American Industry Classification System industries with the fastest projected growth rates over the next eight years for industries with less than the average employment level. Notably, healthcare and social service industries occupied four of the five top positions on the lists of emerging industries and occupied eight of the top 20.

Figure 2.12
Top Emerging Industries

CodeTitle2019
Employment
2027
Employment
2019-27
Total Change
2019-27
Percent
6219Other Ambulatory Health Care Services15,91418,9963,08219.37%
4539Other Miscellaneous Store Retailers29,33734,4545,11717.44%
5239Other Financial Investment Activities20,22023,6823,46217.12%
6117Educational Support Services7,4628,7301,26816.99%
5112Software Publishers17,36520,3112,94616.97%
5417Scientific Research and Development Services19,27722,4423,16516.42%
6116Other Schools and Instruction21,59625,0453,44915.97%
4881Support Activities for Air Transport27,50831,8354,32715.73%
6223Other Hospitals15,76218,2162,45415.57%
7113Performing Arts and Sports Promoters10,48811,9871,49914.29%
5174Satellite Telecommunications6937919814.14%
6215Medical and Diagnostic Laboratories24,40627,8283,42214.02%
6242Emergency and Other Relief Services8,1969,3291,13313.82%
6112Junior Colleges5,5176,22971212.91%
3254Pharmaceutical & Medicine Manufacturing6,8937,72483112.06%
5223Activities Related to Credit Intermediation25,19328,0502,85711.34%
4922Local Messengers and Local Delivery7,0177,81179411.32%
4851Urban Transit Systems2,4992,78028111.24%
3313Alumina and Aluminum Production1,2201,35313310.90%
5152Cable and Other Subscription Programming2,1862,42223610.80%

Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.

(i)  Occupations

Occupational Groups
Occupational groups are the most aggregated level of occupations according to the Standard Occupational Classification and Coding Structure.

The three largest occupational groups in Florida are Office and Administrative Support occupations, with 1,600,310 jobs (16.6 percent of total jobs), sales and related (1,201,019 jobs, 12.4 percent) and food preparation and serving (969,949 jobs, 10.1 percent) occupations. The last two groups are important to Florida tourism. There are two major groups where job requirements do not require more than a high school education: building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations and construction and extraction occupations. Some jobs within the protective service occupations, food preparation and serving-related occupations and production occupations may require a post-secondary non-degree.

Figure 2.13
Percent Distribution of Employment by Major Occupational Group
Florida 2019

Occupational Group CodeOccupational Group NameFlorida EmploymentPercent
110000Management423,8434.39%
130000Business and Financial Operations524,4915.43%
150000Computer and Mathematical225,9672.34%
170000Architecture and Engineering118,8621.23%
190000Life, Physical, and Social Science44,0420.46%
210000Community and Social Services114,8671.19%
230000Legal101,2391.05%
250000Education, Training, and Library460,2304.77%
270000Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media153,2661.59%
290000Healthcare Practitioners and Technical584,9266.06%
310000Healthcare Support265,4872.75%
330000Protective Service251,7802.61%
350000Food Preparation and Serving Related969,94910.05%
370000Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance408,0514.23%
390000Personal Care and Service315,5673.27%
410000Sales and Related1,201,01912.44%
430000Office and Administrative Support1,600,31016.57%
450000Farming, Fishing, and Forestry50,5270.52%
470000Construction and Extraction519,6795.38%
490000Installation, Maintenance, and Repair406,0224.21%
510000Production339,3003.51%
530000Transportation and Material Moving575,8215.96%

Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, December 2019.

Occupational Groups by Local Workforce Development Area
Local area employment by major occupational group is displayed in the following tables. Occupational variation results from the diversity of economic focus and industry mix of Florida’s geographic areas. For example, LWDA 2 (Okaloosa and Walton Counties) has the highest share of Food Preparation and Serving-Related occupations (14.2%). LWDA 3 (Holmes, Washington, Jackson, Calhoun and Liberty Counties) has the highest share of any local area for community and social services (3%), legal occupations (7.5%), Arts, Design, Entertainment and Sports (5.80%), Healthcare Support (7.0%), Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance (9.3%), Personal Care and Service occupations (11.6%), and Installation and Maintenance occupations (6.8%). LWDA 5 (Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla Counties) has the largest share of business and financial operations occupations of any local area (10.5%). LWDA 6 (Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Hamilton, Suwannee and Lafayette Counties) has the largest share of Production (9.6%) and Management occupations (11.2%). LWDA 7 (Columbia, Gilchrist, Union and Dixie Counties) has the largest share of Protective Services (7.9%) of any other local area.

The following tables show the percent distribution of employment by major occupational group for all workforce local areas in Florida grouped by geography.

For a graphic depicting each LWDA, please refer to section VI(a)(1)(A).

Figure 2.14
Percent Distribution by Major Occupational Group
Local Workforce Development Areas 1-7

Occupational Group CodeOccupational Group NameFloridaLWDA 1LWDA 2LWDA 3LWDA 4LWDA 5LWDA 6LWDA 7
110000Management4.4%3.9%4.6%9.4%3.6%4.6%11.2%7.1%
130000Business and Financial Operations5.4%4.4%6.4%2.8%4.7%10.5%2.1%2.7%
150000Computer and Mathematical2.3%1.7%3.3%0.7%1.4%3.6%0.4%0.6%
170000Architecture and Engineering1.2%1.1%3.0%1.7%2.9%1.1%1.1%1.0%
190000Life, Physical0.5%0.5%0.4%0.4%0.8%1.2%0.3%0.3%
210000Community and Social Service1.2%1.4%1.2%3.0%1.4%1.7%1.5%1.5%
230000Legal1.0%0.9%0.5%7.5%0.5%2.1%0.3%0.5%
250000Education, Training, and Library4.8%6.8%4.6%0.6%5.5%8.9%6.1%6.3%
270000Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports1.6%1.2%1.4%5.8%1.0%2.5%0.6%0.5%
290000Healthcare Practitioners and Technical6.1%7.1%5.1%3.2%5.5%5.6%3.6%7.6%
310000Healthcare Support2.7%3.0%1.8%7.0%2.2%2.8%2.6%3.4%
330000Protective Service2.6%2.7%2.0%2.7%3.3%2.5%7.7%7.9%
350000Food Preparation and Serving Related10.0%11.0%14.2%3.7%12.0%8.6%6.9%8.4%
370000Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance4.2%3.9%4.2%9.3%4.0%3.4%3.9%3.9%
390000Personal Care and Service3.3%2.9%3.0%11.6%2.1%2.6%1.8%1.3%
410000Sales and Related12.4%11.2%13.5%1.7%12.2%9.4%8.8%10.8%
430000Office and Administrative Support16.6%18.4%13.9%5.8%16.1%14.9%12.2%13.8%
450000Farming, Fishing0.5%0.2%0.1%3.9%0.3%0.7%4.3%2.0%
470000Construction and Extraction5.4%5.3%4.9%4.0%6.8%3.9%3.4%3.8%
490000Installation, Maintenance4.2%4.4%5.5%6.8%5.1%3.6%4.5%3.9%
510000Production3.5%3.5%2.3%9.4%3.5%2.1%9.6%5.3%
530000Transportation and Material Moving6.0%4.5%4.3%2.8%5.0%3.8%7.1%7.3%

Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, December 2019.

LWDA 9 (Alachua and Bradford Counties) has the highest share of Education, Training and Library (12.7%) and Healthcare Practitioners and Technical (10.5%) occupations. LWDA 11 (Flagler and Volusia Counties) has the highest share of Sales and Related occupations (14.6%) of all local areas. LWDA 13 (Brevard County) has the greatest share of Computer and Mathematical (4.7%) and Architecture and Engineering (4.4%) occupations. LWDA 15 (Hillsborough County) has the greatest share of office and administrative support occupations (19.1%) of any other local area.

Figure 2.15
Percent Distribution by Major Occupational Group
Local Workforce Development Areas 8-16

Occupational Group CodeOccupational Group NameFloridaLWDA 8LWDA 9LWDA 10LWDA 11LWDA 12LWDA 13LWDA 14LWDA 15LWDA 16
110000Management4.4%4.1%4.2%5.5%3.6%4.5%4.0%4.4%4.5%3.9%
130000Business and Financial Operations5.4%6.4%5.3%2.9%3.5%5.7%5.1%6.4%7.0%3.9%
150000Computer and Mathematical2.3%2.6%2.6%0.6%1.2%2.7%4.7%3.1%3.7%1.4%
170000Architecture and Engineering1.2%1.4%1.1%0.9%1.0%1.3%4.4%1.3%1.4%0.8%
190000Life, Physical0.5%0.4%1.2%0.3%0.3%0.4%0.4%0.5%0.6%0.5%
210000Community and Social Service1.2%1.2%1.9%1.2%1.3%0.9%1.1%1.5%1.2%1.7%
230000Legal1.0%0.8%0.8%0.5%0.8%0.9%0.5%1.0%1.3%0.7%
250000Education, Training, and Library4.8%4.4%12.7%5.3%5.4%4.4%4.1%3.7%4.6%6.3%
 

270000
Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports1.6%1.5%1.6%0.9%1.0%2.2%1.2%1.6%1.5%0.9%
 

290000
Healthcare Practitioners and Technical6.1%6.2%10.5%6.8%6.6%4.9%6.5%7.0%5.9%7.5%
310000Healthcare Support2.7%2.6%3.1%3.1%3.5%2.1%3.3%3.5%2.4%3.6%
330000Protective Service2.6%2.4%2.2%2.6%1.9%2.4%2.2%2.2%2.5%2.1%
350000Food Preparation and Serving Related10.0%9.0%8.8%9.6%12.3%11.6%10.2%9.9%8.3%11.8%
 

370000
Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance4.2%3.5%4.3%4.2%5.2%5.2%3.7%3.2%2.9%3.8%
390000Personal Care and Service3.3%3.2%2.5%3.8%3.2%4.0%3.1%3.4%3.0%3.7%
410000Sales and Related12.4%11.3%9.3%12.8%14.6%12.9%10.9%11.5%11.8%12.7%
 

430000
Office and Administrative Support16.6%17.5%13.1%15.2%15.1%15.7%15.4%17.9%19.1%15.3%
450000Farming, Fishing0.5%0.2%0.4%1.0%0.7%0.3%0.1%0.1%0.5%0.3%
470000Construction and Extraction5.4%5.4%3.9%6.7%6.1%5.3%5.5%4.4%4.8%6.2%
490000Installation, Maintenance4.2%4.5%3.4%4.5%4.1%3.8%4.4%4.1%4.0%4.3%
510000Production3.5%3.7%2.7%5.5%4.6%2.9%4.6%5.1%3.4%3.2%
530000Transportation and Material Moving6.0%7.6%4.4%5.9%4.0%5.9%4.5%4.2%5.6%5.4%

Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, December 2019.

LWDA 17 (Polk County) has a greater share of Transportation and Material Moving occupations than other local areas (9.9). LWDA 19 (Hardee, Highlands and DeSoto Counties) had the highest share of Farming and Fishing (6.3%) occupations when compared to other local areas. LWDA 24 (Collier, Lee, Hendry, Charlotte and Glades Counties) had the highest share of Construction and Extraction occupations (9.5%) of any local areas.

Figure 2.16
Percent Distribution by Major Occupational Group
Local Workforce Development Areas 17-24

Occupational Group CodeOccupational Group NameFloridaLWDA 17LWDA 18LWDA 19LWDA 20LWDA 21LWDA 22LWDA 23LWDA 24
110000Management4.4%4.2%4.1%7.9%3.8%4.5%4.3%4.4%4.0%
130000Business and Financial Operations5.4%4.1%4.2%2.3%3.5%5.5%5.6%5.5%3.5%
150000Computer and Mathematical2.3%1.6%1.2%0.5%0.8%2.1%2.7%2.0%1.0%
170000Architecture and Engineering1.2%1.0%0.9%0.9%0.9%1.3%0.9%0.9%0.7%
190000Life, Physical0.5%0.4%0.3%0.4%0.5%0.4%0.4%0.4%0.4%
210000Community and Social Service1.2%1.2%1.1%1.7%1.5%1.1%1.3%1.0%1.0%
230000Legal1.0%0.6%0.9%0.3%0.7%1.5%1.3%1.6%0.7%
250000Education, Training, and Library4.8%5.0%3.8%5.7%4.7%4.4%4.4%4.6%3.9%
270000Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports1.6%1.0%1.5%0.8%1.2%1.6%1.4%1.8%1.3%
 

290000
Healthcare Practitioners and Technical6.1%5.4%6.3%5.8%7.0%5.8%6.3%5.9%6.0%
310000Healthcare Support2.7%2.5%4.0%3.4%3.3%3.2%2.5%2.5%3.0%
330000Protective Service2.6%1.9%1.8%3.7%1.8%3.0%2.7%3.4%2.1%
350000Food Preparation and Serving Related10.0%8.4%11.1%9.7%11.1%10.5%8.8%9.1%12.1%
 

370000
Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance4.2%3.9%4.7%3.9%6.6%5.3%3.7%3.7%6.1%
390000Personal Care and Service3.3%2.5%3.6%3.1%3.6%3.2%3.3%3.0%3.6%
410000Sales and Related12.4%13.0%13.4%10.7%12.6%12.5%13.6%12.7%13.6%
430000Office and Administrative Support16.6%16.2%15.5%14.9%14.6%16.1%18.1%17.6%14.3%
450000Farming, Fishing0.5%0.8%1.2%6.3%0.8%0.8%0.1%0.5%1.1%
470000Construction and Extraction5.4%5.6%7.2%5.2%6.9%5.3%5.0%4.1%9.5%
490000Installation, Maintenance4.2%5.0%4.5%3.8%4.7%4.3%4.6%3.9%4.5%
510000Production3.5%6.1%4.2%2.8%3.8%2.9%2.9%3.4%2.8%
530000Transportation and Material Moving6.0%9.9%4.5%6.3%5.5%4.9%6.0%8.1%5.0%

Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, December 2019.

Detailed Occupations
This section discusses trends of detailed occupations based on the Standard Occupational Classification and Coding Structure.

Existing Demand Occupations
Existing demand occupations are occupations that have the highest number of projected total job openings. Starting with the release of the 2017-2025 projections, job openings will be calculated using the new Separations Method. Total job openings reflect (1) job openings resulting from employment growth, (2) job openings resulting from workers permanently exiting an occupation and (3) job openings resulting from workers transferring to other occupations. In most occupations, replacement needs provide many more job openings than employment growth does.

Existing demand occupations tend to be occupations that serve the most basic societal needs. The most common existing demand occupations in the U.S. labor market are low-skill, hourly wage occupations with high turnover. Florida follows the national pattern, with common existing demand occupations in the state, including Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Retail Salespersons, Waiters and Waitresses, and Cashiers.

The top five existing demand occupations for Florida statewide are related to customer service and hospitality. Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, including Fast Food is the top existing demand occupation, with 431,996 projected total job openings between 2019 and 2027. Some healthcare occupations, such as Registered Nurses and Nursing Assistants, have a relatively high turnover rate and will experience employment growth because of the increasing demand for healthcare services, driven by population growth and aging, expanding insurance coverage and technological change. Registered Nurses are the only top existing demand occupations that requires a degree beyond high school, based on criteria from the U.S. Department of Labor Statistics.

The following table displays the top 15 existing demand occupations (based on 2019-2027 total job openings) for Florida statewide.

Figure 2.17
Top 15 Existing Demand Occupations

  Rank  Code  Occupation  2019
Employment
  2027
Employment
2019-27 Level change2019-27 Percent ChangeTotal Job Openings2018
Median Hourly Wage
2018 Entry Wage2018 Experienced Wage
135-3021Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food244,484289,52045,03618.4431,9969.429.0714.79
241-2031Retail Salespersons348,956369,72520,7696.0430,90611.028.8910.78
335-3031Waiters and Waitresses231,995257,73825,74311.1392,9059.438.8614.41
441-2011Cashiers246,664250,5653,9011.6372,8849.948.9411.3
543-4051Customer Service Representatives252,558271,32018,7627.4283,09015.0311.2918.68
653-7062Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand142,780156,49213,7129.6175,36712.6410.218.64
743-9061Office Clerks, General181,526185,7694,2432.3174,46214.4110.0716.14
843-6014Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive202,065198,807-3,258-1.6167,14516.1311.4819.56
937-2011Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners135,713152,60116,88812.4164,51611.129.3313.69
1043-5081Stock Clerks and Order Fillers141,279151,82410,5457.5158,08211.809.9314.32
1135-2014Cooks, Restaurant108,481124,74116,26015.0145,54912.9610.4914.76
1237-3011Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers116,409131,88615,47713.3132,80212.4310.2514.79
1337-2012Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners102,308114,01711,70911.4124,15410.699.2612.17
1429-1141Registered Nurses198,145225,53727,39213.8112,75530.9624.3435.58
1543-4171Receptionists and Information Clerks90,960100,8969,93610.9108,58813.5814.0726.2

Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.

Emerging Occupations
Emerging occupations consist of (1) new occupations in the workforce and (2) traditional occupations with requisite knowledge, skills and abilities that are currently evolving in response to altered market conditions, new technology and societal changes. Some of the factors that cause occupations to emerge are changing technology, laws, demographics and business practices. In Florida, the fastest growing among the emerging occupations are solar photovoltaic installers, physician assistants, and statisticians.

The most common industry sectors for emerging occupations are healthcare and professional services, due to ongoing advances in medical technology; life, physical and environmental sciences; engineering, mathematics and computer sciences; and psychology and the social sciences. The growth in healthcare sector emerging occupations reflects an increasing demand for medical services due to population aging, expanding medical insurance coverage and technological innovation.

According to education levels required for each job from the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, five of the top 20 emerging occupations require an associate degree (Physical Therapist Assistants, Occupational Therapy Assistants, Diagnostic Medical Sonographers, Respiratory Therapists, and Veterinary Technologists and Technicians), four require a bachelor’s degree (Information Security Analysts, Operations Research Analysts, Actuaries, and Athletic Trainers), five require a master’s degree (Physician Assistants, Statisticians, Nurse Practitioners, Mathematicians, and Genetic Counselors), and two require a doctoral degree (Health Specialties Teachers and Nursing Instructors and Teachers).

The following table shows the top 20 emerging occupations for Florida statewide. This list is based on 2019-2027 projections of percent job growth for occupations with less than the average employment level.

Figure 2.18
Top 20 Emerging Occupations

  Rank  Code  Occupation  2019
Employment
  2027
Employment
2019-27 Level change2019-27 Percent ChangeMain Industry Sector Linkage
(NAICS Level 3)
2018
Median Hourly Wage
2018 Entry Wage2018 Experienced Wage
147-2231Solar Photovoltaic Installers1,1351,82368860.6Construction17.2714.1420.81
229-1071Physician Assistants5,8427,8792,03734.9Education and Health Services50.2033.3159.74
315-2041Statisticians9961,33433833.9Professional and Business Services38.7623.9647.13
429-1171Nurse Practitioners9,84212,8853,04330.9Education and Health Services46.7635.2655.28
515-1122Information Security Analysts5,3116,7381,42726.9Professional and Business Services42.8622.6133.15
625-1071Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary11,38414,2082,82424.8Education and Health Services61,085.0027.9652.33
731-2021Physical Therapist Assistants5,6927,0451,35323.8Education and Health Services29.5516.1831.38
825-1072Nursing Instructors and Teachers, Postsecondary2,9943,68469023.0Education and Health Services-22.6732.9
915-2031Operations Research Analysts6,9058,4891,58422.9Government32.3322.7341.79
1015-2021Mathematicians1271562922.8Government44.3810.8414.16
1131-2011Occupational Therapy Assistants2,2972,79950221.9Education and Health Services29.7524.4435.25
1229-2032Diagnostic Medical Sonographers6,0197,3201,30121.6Education and Health Services31.5214.6829.21
1347-4061Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators2923556321.6Construction 22.3416.4930.54
1429-9092Genetic Counselors1211472621.5Education and Health Services18.4824.4947.49
1531-2022Physical Therapist Aides2,7783,37459621.5Education and Health Services12.8726.4845.55
1615-2011Actuaries57970212321.2Financial Activities48.299.7214.93
1729-1126Respiratory Therapists9,72711,7932,06621.2Education and Health Services27.7211.7518.12
1831-9096Veterinary Assistants and Laboratory Animal Caretakers5,6906,8471,15720.3Professional and Business Services12.3322.76 

30.42
1929-2056Veterinary Technologists and Technicians9,94611,9662,02020.3Professional and Business Services15.4952.55101.65
2029-9091Athletic Trainers1,3631,63527220.0Education and Health Services

 
44,612.0013.3519.82

Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.

The needs of employers with respect to knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) are provided for each occupation in the labor market by the O*NET system (see https://www.onetonline.org/).

By using the content in the O*NET database, it is possible to analyze the knowledge, skills and abilities for individual occupations, occupational groups, or targeted occupations. The following is an analysis of occupations that are emerging, have rapid growth and have numerous job openings. O*NET level and importance scores for the various KSAs were matched to the relevant occupational groups. The level and importance score were added together and standardized to a 100-point scale.

The highest KSAs for emerging occupations are knowledge of English Language, Customer & Personal Service, Reading Comprehension, Critical Thinking, Oral Comprehension and Oral Expression.

Figure 2.19
Emerging Occupations Top Knowledge Scores

Figure 2.19 - Emerging Occupations Top Knowledge Scores is a bar chart showing the 10 highest ranking knowledges required for emerging occupations in Florida along with their compiled O*Net scores: English Language: 66.4; Customer and Personal Service: 62.0; Mathematics: 59.4; Education and Training: 58.2; Computers and Electronics: 55.2; Psychology: 49.4; Medicine and Dentistry : 48.2; Biology: 44.7; Administration and Management: 43.3; Clerical: 41.6
Source: O*NET and Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Figure 2.20
Emerging Occupations
Top Skills Scores

Figure 2.20 - Emerging Occupations Top Skills Scores is a bar chart that shows the 10 highest ranking skills required for emerging occupations in Florida along with their compiled O*Net scores.  Reading comprehension: 63.7; Critical Thinking: 63.2; Active Listening: 63.0 Speaking: 60.8; Active Learning: 57.7; Writing: 56.9; Complex Problem Solving: 56.5; Judgment and Decision Making: 56.0; Monitoring: 55.6; Social Perceptiveness: 52.8
Source: O*NET and Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Figure 2.21
Emerging Occupations

Top Abilities Scores

Figure 2.21  Emerging Occupations Top Abilities Scores is a bar chart that shows the 10 highest ranking abilities required for emerging occupations in Florida along with their compiled O*Net scores.  Oral Comprehension: 67.3; Oral Expression: 6.0; Written Comprehension: 64.7; Problem Sensitivity: 63.3; Deductive Reasoning: 63.3; Inductive Reasoning: 62.6; Written Expression: 60.3; Near Vision: 60.0; Information Ordering: 59.3; Speech Clarity: 56.2.
Source: O*NET and Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occupational employment projections tables for all Florida geographic areas can be found on the Labor Market Statistics Website at http://floridajobs.org/labor-market-information. Tables for occupations adding the most new jobs, occupations with the fastest growth rates and declining occupations are available.

Growing Occupations
The top occupations in the state’s labor market can be represented in different ways. Below are two representations, the first showing the level of change (2019 – 2027) and the second showing percent change over the timeframe of the latest occupational projections (2019 – 2027). A compilation of knowledge, skills, and abilities across these rankings are also provided.

Occupations Gaining the Most New Jobs
The occupations gaining the most new jobs represent a mix of occupations needed by tourism-related industries, healthcare, and business administration. Combined Food Workers (45,036 new jobs), Waiters and Waitresses (25,743 new jobs) and Restaurant Cooks (16,260 new jobs) are employed in tourism-related industries. Registered Nurses (27,392 new jobs), Medical Assistants (14,369 new jobs), and Nursing Assistants (10,446 new jobs) are Healthcare occupations. Many of the top occupations with the most new jobs are used by many different industries. These include Janitors and Cleaners (16,888 new jobs), Accountants and Auditors (10,775 new jobs), and Receptionists and Information Clerks (9,936 new jobs).

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, five of the top 20 occupations that will gain the most new jobs from 2019 to 2027 require employees to have a bachelor’s degree or higher: Registered Nurses, Accountants and Auditors, Software Developers, General and Operations Managers, and Management Analysts.

Figure 2.22
Occupations Gaining the Most New Jobs in Florida

  Rank  Code  Occupation2019
Employment
2027
Employment
2019-27
Level Change
2019-27
Percent Growth
Total Job Openings
135-3021Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food244,484289,52045,03618.4431,996
229-1141Registered Nurses198,145225,53727,39213.8112,755
335-3031Waiters and Waitresses231,995257,73825,74311.1392,905
441-2031Retail Salespersons348,956369,72520,7696.0430,906
543-4051Customer Service Representatives252,558271,32018,7627.4283,090
637-2011Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners135,713152,60116,88812.4164,516
735-2014Cooks, Restaurant108,481124,74116,26015.0145,549
837-3011Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers116,409131,88615,47713.3132,802
931-9092Medical Assistants56,38970,75814,36925.567,928
1053-7062Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand142,780156,49213,7129.6175,367
1137-2012Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners102,308114,01711,70911.4124,154
1213-2011Accountants and Auditors91,055101,83010,77511.877,945
1343-5081Stock Clerks and Order Fillers141,279151,82410,5457.5158,082
1431-1014Nursing Assistants98,029108,47510,44610.7102,373
1515-1132Software Developers, Applications39,20549,62710,42226.632,726
1647-2061Construction Laborers91,481101,4589,97710.987,770
1711-1021General and Operations Managers87,36897,3179,94911.469,329
1849-9071Maintenance and Repair Workers, General97,613107,5509,93710.289,006
1943-4171Receptionists and Information Clerks90,960100,8969,93610.9108,588
2013-1111Management Analysts59,36668,7459,37915.852,322

Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, December 2019.

The highest KSAs for occupations projected to have the most new job openings in 2027 are Customer & Personal Service, English Language, Active Listening, Speaking, Oral Comprehension and Oral Expression.

Figure 2.23
Occupations with the Most Job Openings Top Knowledge Scores

Figure 2.23 Occupations with the Most Job Openings Top Knowledge Scores  is a bar chart that shows the 10 highest ranking knowledges required for occupations projected to gain the most new jobs in Florida along with their compiled O*Net scores.  Customer and Personal Service: 63.7;  English Language: 57.7; Mathematics: 46.6; Education and Training: 45.8;  Administration and Management: 43.9; Computers and Electronics: 41.9;  Clerical: 39.2; Psychology 38.9; Public Safety and Security: 35.6; Personnel and Human Resources: 31.6.
Source: O*NET and Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2.24
Occupations with the Most Job Openings Top Skills Scores

Figure 2.24 Occupations with the Most Job Openings Top Skills Scores is a bar chart that shows the 10 highest ranking skills required for occupations projected to gain the most new jobs in Florida along with their compiled O*Net scores.  Active Listening: 55.4; Speaking: 53.9; Critical Thinking: 52.2 Reading Comprehension: 51.3; Social Perceptiveness: 50.6; Coordination: 50.2; Monitoring: 49.4; Service Orientation: 49.2; Judgment and Decision Making: 46.9; Time Management: 45.1
Source: O*NET and Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 




Figure 2.25
Occupations with the Most Job Openings Top Abilities Scores

Figure 2.25 Occupations with the Most Job Openings Top Abilities Scores is a bar chart that shows the 10 highest ranking abilities required for occupations projected to gain the most new jobs in Florida along with their compiled O*Net scores.  Oral Comprehension: 59.8; Oral Expression: 58.4; Problem Sensitivity: 55.4; Near Vision: 54.8; Speech Recognition: 53.1; Written Comprehension: 53.1; Deductive Reasoning: 52.4; Information Ordering: 51.9; Speech Clarity: 51.9; Inductive Reasoning: 51.2.
Source: O*NET and Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Fastest-Growing Occupations
Only occupations with a minimum of 4,000 jobs or more in 2019 are included in the analysis below.

Twelve of the top 20 occupations ranked by percent change are in the health practitioner or healthcare support major occupational groups, while the rest have occupations in professional, scientific, and technical service industries. The fastest-growing occupation is Physician Assistant (5,842 jobs in 2019, +35 percent growth). The Medical Assistants occupation is the largest on the top 20 list with 56,389 jobs in 2019. Some occupations that fall under professional, scientific, and technical services include software developers (39,205 jobs in 2019, +26.6 percent growth), Informational Security Analysts (5,311 jobs in 2019, +26.9 percent growth), and Market Research Analysts (31,738 jobs in 2019, +22.6 percent growth).

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, five of the fastest growing occupations require bachelor’s degrees (Information Security Analysts, Software Developers, Operation Research Analysts, Marketing Research Analysts, and Financial Managers), two require master’s degrees (physicians assistants and nurse practitioners), while three require doctoral degrees (health specialties teachers, postsecondary, physical therapists and veterinarians).

Figure 2.26
Fastest Growing Occupations in Florida

  Rank  Code  Occupation2019
Employment
2027
Employment
2019-27
Level Change
2019-27
Percent Growth
Total Job Openings
129-1071Physician Assistants5,8427,8792,03734.94,936
229-1171Nurse Practitioners9,84212,8853,04330.97,411
315-1122Information Security Analysts5,3116,7381,42726.94,628
415-1132Software Developers, Applications39,20549,62710,42226.632,726
531-1011Home Health Aides28,80136,2167,41525.736,358
631-9092Medical Assistants56,38970,75814,36925.567,928
725-1071Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary11,38414,2082,82424.810,477
831-2021Physical Therapist Assistants5,6927,0451,35323.87,341
939-9021Personal Care Aides28,26234,8276,56523.241,878
1015-2031Operations Research Analysts6,9058,4891,58422.95,166
1113-1161Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists31,73838,9067,16822.634,061
1229-2032Diagnostic Medical Sonographers6,0197,3201,30121.64,011
1331-9011Massage Therapists14,49417,5743,08021.316,068
1429-1126Respiratory Therapists9,72711,7932,06621.26,043
1531-9096Veterinary Assistants and Laboratory Animal Caretakers5,6906,8471,15720.38,742
1629-2056Veterinary Technologists and Technicians9,94611,9662,02020.38,751
1729-1123Physical Therapists14,83417,8332,99920.28,235
1839-2021Nonfarm Animal Caretakers15,89218,9753,08319.423,853
1911-3031Financial Managers23,35427,8794,52519.419,378
2029-1131Veterinarians4,8225,74992719.22,409

Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.

The highest KSAs for occupations with the projected fastest-growing occupations by 2027 are Customer and Personal Service, English Language, Active Listening, Reading Comprehension, Oral Comprehension and Oral Expression.

Figure 2.27
Rapid Growth Occupations Top Knowledge Scores

Figure 2.27 Rapid Growth Occupations Top Knowledge Scores is a bar chart that shows the 10 highest ranking knowledges required for occupations that are projected to be the fastest growing in Florida along with their compiled O*Net scores.  Customer and Personal Service: 68.5; English Language: 64.5; Mathematics: 51.9; Computers and Electronics: 51.4; Education and Training: 50.5; Psychology: 49.0; Administration and Management: 46.1; Medicine and Dentistry: 44.8; Clerical: 43.1; Biology: 39.6.
Source: O*NET and Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2.28
Rapid Growth Occupations Top Skills Scores

Figure 2.28 Rapid Growth Occupations Top Skills Scores is a bar chart that shows the 10 highest ranking skills required for occupations that are projected to be the fastest growing in Florida along with their compiled O*Net scores.  Active Listening: 62.4;  Reading Comprehension: 62.0; Critical Thinking: 61.0; Speaking: 60.6; Monitoring: 56.9; Judgment and Decision Making: 55.8; Writing: 55.3; Active Learning: 55.0; Social Perceptiveness: 54.8; Complex Problem Solving: 54.0.
Source: O*NET and Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2.29
Rapid Growth Occupations Top Abilities Scores

Figure 2.29 - Rapid Growth Occupations Top Abilities Scores is a bar chart that shows the 10 highest ranking abilities required for occupations that are projected to be the fastest growing in Florida along with their compiled O*Net scores.  Oral Comprehension: 66.2; Oral Expression: 65.7; Problem Sensitivity: 63.7; Written Comprehension: 62.2;  Deductive Reasoning: 61.6; Inductive Reasoning: 61.1; Near Vision: 59.7;  Written Expression: 58.0; Information: Ordering: 56.5; Speech Clarity: 56.0.
Source: O*NET and Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, December 2019.